Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Hot Rod Ford 1966 F100 Truck For Sale on 2040cars

US $30,000.00
Year:1966 Mileage:1274 Color: Electric Blue / Tan L
Location:

Fredericksburg, Virginia, United States

Fredericksburg, Virginia, United States
Transmission:Manual Body Type:Pickup Truck Engine:390 V8 Vehicle Title:Clear Fuel Type:Gasoline For Sale By:Private Seller

VIN: F10AN860130
Year: 1966
Number of Cylinders: 8
Make: Ford
Model: F-100
Trim: Styleside
Cab Type (For Trucks Only): Regular Cab
Drive Type: RWD
Options: Leather Seats
Mileage: 1,274
Exterior Color: Electric Blue
Interior Color: Tan L

Condition: Used: A vehicle is considered used if it has been registered and issued a title. Used vehicles have had at least one previous owner. The condition of the exterior, interior and engine can vary depending on the vehicle's history. See the seller's listing for full details and description of any imperfections. ... 

Auto Services in Virginia

A & L Radiator & Auto Repair ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Radiators Automotive Sales & Service
Address: 7702 Backlick Rd Ste C, Arlington
Phone: (703) 455-0070

Sun Tech Auto Glass ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Glass-Auto, Plate, Window, Etc, Windshield Repair
Address: 934 N Augusta St, Churchville
Phone: (888) 543-0433

O`Reilly Auto Parts ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies
Address: 178 Kane St, Gate-City
Phone: (276) 386-7311

Greenbush Automotive Inc ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 15329 Bull St, Nelsonia
Phone: (757) 665-5809

New Beginnings Auto Body Inc. ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Body Repairing & Painting, Commercial Auto Body Repair
Address: 15482 Warwick Blvd., Suite C, Grafton
Phone: (757) 888-2394

Van`s Garage ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service
Address: 77 Wayside Dr, Weyers-Cave
Phone: (540) 234-8294

Auto blog

2013 Ford Mustang V6

Mon, 10 Jun 2013 11:57:00 EST

Secretary Trim, Evolved
There was a time not so long ago when opting for a base Ford Mustang meant getting little more than some sheetmetal, an anemic four-cylinder engine and what may very well have been the world's most disappointing automatic transmission. During the Fox Body years, Ford seemed hell-bent on living up to Carroll Shelby's derogatory description of the coupe as little more than a runabout for demure office assistants, and the result was a base model with fewer sporting intentions than a Dilbert day calendar.
Some 20 years later, hopping behind the wheel of an entry-level pony is an entirely different experience. With all of the menacing aesthetics of the brawnier GT, a well-equipped interior and a drivetrain that toes the line between efficiency and power better than few before it, the 2013 Ford Mustang V6 is an attractive option for buyers in the big coupe market. But is it attractive enough to forgo the beastly GT?

Is it time for American carmakers to give up on dual-clutch transmissions? [w/poll]

Mon, 22 Jul 2013 19:31:00 EST

Last week, in the midst of Detroit's first days seeking relief in Chapter 9 of the bankruptcy code, Automotive News contributor Larry P. Vellequette penned an editorial suggesting that American car companies raise the white flag on dual clutch transmissions and give up on trying to persuade Americans to buy cars fitted with them. Why? Because, Vellequette says, like CVT transmissions, they "just don't sound right or feel right to American drivers." (Note: In the article, it's not clear if Vellequette is arguing against wet-clutch and dry-clutch DCTs or just dry-clutch DCTs, which is what Ford and Chrysler use.) The article goes on to state that Ford and Chrysler have experimented with DCTs and that both consumers and the automotive press haven't exactly given them glowing reviews, despite their quicker shifts and increased fuel efficiency potential compared to torque-converter automatic transmissions.
Autoblog staffers who weighed in on the relevance of DCTs in American cars generally disagreed with the blanket nature of Vellequette's statement that they don't sound or feel right, but admit that their lack of refinement compared to traditional automatics can be an issue for consumers. That's particularly true in workaday cars like the Ford Focus and Dodge Dart, both of which have come in for criticism in reviews and owner surveys. From where we sit, the higher-performance orientation of such transmissions doesn't always meld as well with the marching orders of everyday commuters (particularly if drivers haven't been educated as to the transmission's benefits and tradeoffs), and in models not fitted with paddle shifters, it's particularly hard for drivers to use a DCT to its best advantage.
Finally, we also note that DCT tuning is very much an evolving science. For instance, Autoblog editors who objected to dual-clutch tuning in the Dart have more recently found the technology agreeable in the Fiat 500L. Practice makes perfect - or at least more acceptable.

1979 Dodge Li'l Red Express in Generation Gap showdown with 1933 Ford Pickup

Fri, 18 Jul 2014 12:45:00 EST

Auto enthusiasts love a good debate, whether it's Mustang versus Camaro or Ferrari against Lamborghini. But how about a battle between two very different vintages of classic pickup trucks? In this case, the fight is between a 1979 Dodge Li'l Red Express and a 1933 Ford Model 46 truck with a flathead V8.
The shootout comes courtesy of the internet series Generation Gap, and its concept is super-simple. One guy prefers classics, and the other likes newer rides. They choose a category, pick two vehicles and put them head to head. In this case, neither is exactly modern, though. The Ford is more than old enough to receive Social Security checks, and the Dodge is hardly a young whippersnapper.
Other than both being pickups, these two models were made to serve very different functions. The Li'l Red Express was basically the progenitor of today's muscle trucks, with a big V8 that made it one of the quickest new models in its day (admittedly, 1979 was a rough time for automotive performance). On the other hand, the '33 Ford was just meant to work, with little pretense for anything else. One of the hosts describes it as "the simplest, most difficult" vehicle he's driven because of the tricky double clutchwork necessary to shift gears. Scroll down to watch the video and try to decide which of these two American classics you would rather have in your garage.