Find or Sell Used Cars, Trucks, and SUVs in USA

Chevy S-10 on 2040cars

Year:1985 Mileage:89000
Location:

Lavonia, Georgia, United States

Lavonia, Georgia, United States

THIS IS A GOOD RUNNING TRUCK IT IS MISSING DOOR LOCK ON DRIVER SIDE CLEAN INSIDE HAVE ANY QUESTION CALL 706 599-6696

Auto Services in Georgia

A1A Truck & Auto Center ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Automobile Parts & Supplies, Truck Service & Repair
Address: 463495 State Road 200, Saint-Marys
Phone: (904) 225-2504

Mr Perfect Customs ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Accessories, Automobile Radios & Stereo Systems
Address: 1012 Veterans Memorial Hwy SW, East-Point
Phone: (678) 540-7750

Auto Headliners Mobile Service ★★★★★

Automobile Parts & Supplies, Automobile Seat Covers, Tops & Upholstery, Furniture Stores
Address: Milton
Phone: (678) 758-0542

Henry`s Fast Lube ★★★★★

Auto Repair & Service, Auto Oil & Lube, Window Tinting
Address: 10111 U.S. 278, Covington
Phone: (770) 787-7579

NEW LINE AUTO SALES INC. ★★★★★

Used Car Dealers
Address: 5865 Buford Hwy, Avondale-Est
Phone: (404) 437-7970

Kia Motors America Inc ★★★★★

New Car Dealers
Address: 2929 Lenox Rd NE, Atlanta
Phone: (678) 385-8500

Auto blog

Lutz dishes dirt on GM in latest Autoline Detroit

Mon, 20 Jun 2011 19:57:00 EST

Bob Lutz sits down for Autoline Detroit - Click above to watch video after the jump
Autoline Detroit recently played host to Bob Lutz, and, as is always the case, the former General Motors vice chairman dished out some great commentary. Lutz was promoting his new book Car Guys vs. Bean Counters: The Battle for the Soul of American Business, and talk quickly turned to his role as it related to product development and high-level decision making at GM. While on the topic of brand management, Lutz revealed a few rather interesting tidbits about his former employer:
All Chevrolet vehicles were required to have five-spoke aluminum wheels and a chrome band up front, as part of the Bowtie brand's overall image.

Why the Corvette is Chevrolet's billion-dollar baby

Thu, 28 Feb 2013 09:59:00 EST

Edmunds has worked up a piece that tries to figure out just how much the global Chevrolet Corvette economy is worth, a spitballed guesstimate putting the number at more than $2.5 billion with the proviso that the number is probably low. It starts by taking Corvette's new car sales of 14,132 units last year, which would equate to $714,725,900 (including destination) assuming ever car sold was a base coupe with no options. In the final tally, a little extra padding gets that number up to $750,000,000.
But that's not all. Consider this: Many of the almost 1.4 million Corvettes produced over the model's history are still on the road. There are new parts being produced and aftermarket companies like Mid-America Motorworks deaing business, that single Illinois company doing more than $40 million a year in sales. There are the Corvette events large and small, restorers who do nothing but Corvettes, salvage yards that deal only in used Corvette parts and the Corvette magazines where owners find all this stuff.
And then there are the Corvette-themed tchotchkes, every single one of which provides a tiny contribution to the huge licensing royalties that General Motors collects every year. The article admits there's no way to come to an accurate number, but it just goes to show how valuable one specific model can be to a company.

Corvette driver escapes decapitation in crash by ducking

Mon, 18 Mar 2013 19:14:00 EST

You wouldn't believe it by looking at the Corvette in these pictures, but the driver of the Chevrolet that slammed into the back of this moving truck survived with only non-life threatening injuries. The crash occurred near Los Angeles on the southbound 405 Freeway on Monday, March 4. Fire crews reportedly had to raise the moving truck in order to extricate the driver, who escaped perhaps the worst possible death imaginable - decapitation - by simply ducking prior to impact.
What's supposed to prevent a crash like this from becoming lethal is a Mansfield Bar, so named because the low-hanging bar affixed to the rear of semi truck trailers became mandated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration after the death of popular movie actress Jayne Mansfield in 1967 from a rear-end collision with a tractor trailer.
The Mansfield Bar is designed to prevent under-riding, and in 1998, the rules governing them were revised to lower the bar to 22 inches off the ground. Even at the height, some vehicles, including sports cars like the Corvette, have leading edges that are low enough to clear them. That's particularly true when the car in question is braking hard and its weight is pitched forward, lowering the nose even more).